IFX Mail Archive: Re: IFX> draft-moore-qualdocs-protocol-00.

IFX Mail Archive: Re: IFX> draft-moore-qualdocs-protocol-00.

Re: IFX> draft-moore-qualdocs-protocol-00.txt

From: Carl Kugler/Boulder/IBM (kugler@us.ibm.com)
Date: Mon Aug 21 2000 - 19:09:27 EDT

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    You could easily set up some access control policies based on certificates.
    For example:

    - Only accept jobs from clients having a certificate containing OU=PSD,
    O=IBM (OU is organizational unit, O is organization)
    - Only accept jobs from clients having a certificate issued and signed by
    my private certificate authority (CA)
    - Only accept admin requests from clients having a certificate issued and
    signed by my private CA, containing O=PSD, OU=Admins

    Or, you could create a directory or database mapping subject unique
    identifiers to specific capabilities.

         -Carl

    pmoore@peerless.com@pwg.org on 08/21/2000 03:23:43 PM

    Sent by: owner-ifx@pwg.org

    To: Carl Kugler/Boulder/IBM@IBMUS
    cc: ifx@pwg.org
    Subject: Re: IFX> draft-moore-qualdocs-protocol-00.txt

    You are quite correct - and I certainly believe we should explore
    certificate
    based authentication.

     Access control is more of a challenge - as far as I am aware (but I am
    probably
    wrong) there is no widely accepted mechanism for certificate based access
    control.

    "Carl Kugler/Boulder/IBM" <kugler@us.ibm.com> on 08/21/2000 02:09:47 PM

    To: ifx@pwg.org
    cc: (bcc: Paul Moore/AUCO/US)

    Subject: IFX> draft-moore-qualdocs-protocol-00.txt

    <!--StartFragment-->7 Security considerations
    QD presents an interesting challenge of balancing security and
    openness. Many of the envisaged uses of QD require confidentiality of
    the data . at the same time the receiver typically has no prior
    knowledge of the sender or the sending user. This last point will
    normally rule out all user-based authentication and access control.
    <!--EndFragment-->

    Comment: I don't think the receiver's lack of knowledge of the sender
    necessarily rules out all user-based authentication. Authentication is

     "the act of verifying the claimed identity of an individual,
     station or originator".

    Client-side certificates could be used for this. I think it's useful,
    because it would allow one to set up a Printer that is publicly, but not
    anonymously, accessible.

         -Carl



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