IPP Mail Archive: IPP> RFC 3002 - Overview of 2000 IAB Wirel

IPP Mail Archive: IPP> RFC 3002 - Overview of 2000 IAB Wirel

IPP> RFC 3002 - Overview of 2000 IAB Wireless Workshop

From: McDonald, Ira (IMcDonald@crt.xerox.com)
Date: Mon Dec 18 2000 - 18:20:38 EST

  • Next message: erferiojewi@surya.nse.co.in: "(no subject)"

    Hi folks,

    RFC 3002 is the final form of a VERY useful (and brief) document:

      ftp://ftp.isi.edu/in-notes/rfc3002.txt

    The IAB (Internet Activities Board) is the parent body that
    charters both the IETF (Internet Engineering Task Force - for
    protocols) and IRTF (Internet Research Task Force - long-term
    research).

    Note the market prediction that the mobile Internet may be as large
    as the wired Internet as soon as 2003!! This has major implications
    for all network products.

    This is the most readable short tutorial on the technical issues
    and barriers for the Wireless Internet that I've ever seen.

    In particular, serious technical limitations of both IPv4/IPv6 (and
    IPsec security) and TCP are discussed. The concerns of the ground-
    aircraft-, and satellite-based wireless infrastructure providers are
    surveyed. URLs to the dozens of presentations by subject matter
    experts are included.

    Cheers,
    - Ira McDonald, consulting architect to Sharp and Xerox
      High North Inc

    --------------------------------------------------------------------

    Below are the Abstract and Introduction from RFC 3002:

    Abstract

       This document provides an overview of a workshop held by the Internet
       Architecture Board (IAB) on wireless internetworking. The workshop
       was hosted by Nokia in Mountain View, CA, USA on February 29 thru
       March 2, 2000. The goal of the workshop was to assess current and
       future uses of Internet technology in wireless environments, to make
       recommendations on research and standardization tasks to improve
       acceptance of Internet network and transport protocols in wireless
       environments, and to evaluate methods to improve communication and
       collaboration among Internet standards working groups and those of
       the telephony and wireless sectors. This report summarizes the
       conclusions and recommendations of the IAB on behalf of the IETF
       community.

    1 Introduction

       Wireless technology, including wireless LANs, data transfer over
       cellular radio (GSM, 3GPP, etc), and mobile operations from aircraft
       and near earth spacecraft are becoming increasingly important. Some
       market projections suggest that a mobile Internet in parallel with or
       augmenting the wired Internet may be comparable in size to the wired
       Internet as early as 2003.

       The wireless operators have not, however, chosen to use IPv4, TCP,
       full HTTP/HTML, and other applications for a variety of reasons.
       These relate to edge device cost, bandwidth limitations, perceived
       protocol imperfections, unnecessary complexities, the chattiness of
       the application protocols, and network layer addressing issues.
       Unfortunately, this creates some serious issues at the wired/wireless
       demarcation: end to end operation is sacrificed, security is
       compromised, and automated content modification in some form becomes
       necessary. The IAB considers these to be serious fundamental issues,
       which will in time be a serious impediment to the usability of the
       combined Internet if not addressed.

       The Internet Architecture Board (IAB), on February 29 thru March 2,
       2000, held an invitational workshop on wireless internetworking. The
       goal of the workshop was to assess current and future uses of
       Internet technology in wireless environments, to make recommendations
       on research and standardization tasks to improve acceptance of
       Internet network and transport protocols in wireless environments,
       and to evaluate methods to improve communication and collaboration
       among Internet standards working groups and those of the telephony
       and wireless sectors.

       The following topics were defined for discussion:

            + Local area wireless technologies

            + Cellular wireless technologies

            + Wireless Application Protocol (WAP)

            + Near-space and aviation wireless applications

            + Voice over IP (VoIP) over wireless networks

            + Security over wireless networks

            + Transport and QoS over wireless networks

            + Use of WWW protocols over wireless and small screen devices

            + Addressing requirements for wireless devices

            + Compression and bit error requirements for wireless networks

       The fundamental question addressed in these discussion is "what are
       the issues, and what really needs to be done to unify the Internet
       below the application layer." Applications will also need to be
       addressed, but were perceived to be more than could be usefully
       discussed in a three-day workshop, and probably require different
       expertise.

       Section 2 presents a concise overview of the individual presentations
       made during the workshop. References to more extensive materials are
       provided. Details on major discussion topics are provided in section
       3. Section 4 presents the recommendations made to wireless
       operators, IRTF, and IETF on the architectural roadmap for the next
       few years. It should be noted that not all participants agreed with
       all of the statements, and it was not clear whether anyone agreed
       with all of them. However, the recommendations made are based on
       strong consensus among the participants. Finally, section 5
       highlights references to security considerations discussed, appendix
       A lists contact information of workshop participants, and appendix B
       lists the author contact information.



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