[IPP] Fwd: Value of "printer-resolution" | "printer-resolution-supported" vs. the "pwg-raster-resolution-supported"?

[IPP] Fwd: Value of "printer-resolution" | "printer-resolution-supported" vs. the "pwg-raster-resolution-supported"?

[IPP] Fwd: Value of "printer-resolution" | "printer-resolution-supported" vs. the "pwg-raster-resolution-supported"?

Ira McDonald blueroofmusic at gmail.com
Sun Jul 24 16:42:53 UTC 2016


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Michael Sweet <msweet at apple.com>
Date: Wed, Jul 13, 2016 at 5:47 PM
Subject: Re: Value of "printer-resolution" | "printer-resolution-supported"
vs. the "pwg-raster-resolution-supported"?
To: Smith Kennedy <smith.kennedy at hp.com>
Cc: Ira McDonald <blueroofmusic at gmail.com>


Smith,

> On Jul 13, 2016, at 5:13 PM, Kennedy, Smith (Wireless Architect) <
smith.kennedy at hp.com> wrote:
>
> Ah, so it is the difference between the input document format content
resolution and the resolution the Printer or language interpreter should
use for the output. I can see how that might be useful for vector formats
because that might factor into the output speed or marking agent usage.
>
> But for raster document formats, if you send a lower resolution,
upscaling cannot "create" information, so you would still end up with the
source resolution, right?  (I'll discuss this with our language interpreter
/ color science people...)

You can't make the equivalent of vector quality, no, but "resolution
enhancement technology" has been a staple of laser printers for years to
improve the effective resolution when printing.  Also, most printers do not
produce 255 different sizes of dots so you "lose" some resolution in the
printer due to dithering/halftoning.

As far as edge detail you can see a greater improvement between 300 and 600
DPI than (say) 600 and 1200 DPI thanks to the limits of visual acuity - at
that point the dots are so small you are better off using the higher
resolution to improve shading/dithering than getting a smoother looking
line/character.  Thus, the document resolution can be 600DPI while the
output resolution is a much higher resolution.

_________________________________________________________
Michael Sweet, Senior Printing System Engineer
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